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USU Geology in the News

 


Issac LarsenUSU Geology Alumnus Wins High National Honor
AMHERST, Mass. – The American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) Earth and Planetary Surface Processes Focus Group announced this week that it has chosen Isaac Larsen [USU MS '03], assistant professor of geosciences at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, to receive the coveted Luna B. Leopold Young Scientist Award for 2017. It recognizes a young scientist “for making a significant and outstanding contribution that advances the field of earth and planetary surface processes.” Read the full article by Janet Lathrop from the University of Massachusetts–Amherst here.

GUARDIAN 24 May 2017

The Guardian: Extra Layer of Tectonic Plates Discovered within Earth's Mantle, Scientists Say
Preliminary findings by a research team that includes USU geologist Ravi Kanda suggest that they have found a possible layer of tectonic plates within the Earth’s mantle which could explain a mysterious series of earthquakes in the Pacific. Read the full article by Howard Lee and Hannah Devlin in The Guardian here.

 

There IS an App for That!
USU Geology alum Natalie Bursztyn (PhD '15) has two high-profile papers being published from her USU dissertation research! Natalie, along with advisor Joel Pederson, and colleagues in USU's Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences department conducted NSF-funded research developing and testing apps for smartphones that provide virtual geology field trips to Grand Canyon. Check out Natalie's June 2017 GSA Today cover article, as well as her April 2017 paper in Geosphere..
Tedx PosterUtah State Today: In Hot Water: USU Geologists Probe the Snake River Pain's Energy Potential
Utah State University geologists examined a scientific borehole drilled about a mile into the Snake River Plain at Idaho’s Mountain Home Air Force Base, which lies in the tracks of the Yellowstone Hotspot. Recent USU grads James Kessler, PhD ’14 and Jerome Varriale, MS '16; current undergrads Mikaela Pulsipher and Fallon Rowe, and faculty members Kelly Bradbury, Jim Evans and John Shervais, along with colleague Doug Schmitt of the University of Alberta, reported their findings in the April, 2017 issue of Lithosphere. Read the full article by Mary-Ann Muffoletto in Utah State Today here.

 

Asian seashoreFinding Fault: USU Geologist Alexis Ault Receives Prestigious NSF CAREER Grant
Assistant Professor Alexis Ault is a 2017 recipient of a prestigious Faculty Early Career Development ‘CAREER’ Award from the National Science Foundation. The NSF’s highly competitive grant program for junior faculty, CAREER awards recognize demonstrated excellence in research, teaching and the integration of education and research. Ault’s award provides a five-year grant of $631,000. Read the full article by Mary-Ann Muffoletto here.

Stream Table with James Mauch and Evan MillsapUtah State Today: Geology Rocks at USU's 'Rock-n-Fossil Day'
It was a day of discovery and learning all about rocks on 11 February 2017. Read the full article by Mary-Ann Muffoletto in Utah State Today here.

 

Liddell-PedersonFIELD NOTES Fall 2016
The Utah State University Department of Geology's Fall 2016 newsletter is available now. Read about all the latest developments in the department here.






Ken Carpenter Fremont PithouseUtah State Magazine:  An Important Story to Tell
While excavating a fremont pithouse, USU-Eastern scientists Ken Carpenter and Timothy Riley decided to replicate its construction.  Now, the depth of their reality and understanding is escalating. Read the full article by John DeVilbis in Utah State Magazine here.

 

Amy MoserUtah State Today: From IGNITE to TEDxUSU: Amy Moser Continues to Spread Her Passion for Geology
TEDxUSU will be held Oct. 28 in the Manon Caine Russell Kathryn Caine Wanlass Performance Hall on USU's Logan campus. This year's TEDxUSU lineup includes six USU faculty members, two USU students, and two external speakers, including Amy Moser, Masters student of Jim Evans. Read the full Utah State Today article by Katie Feinauer here.

Carmel Formation by Elizabeth PetrieScience Daily: USU Geologists among an International Collaboration of Scientists
Utah State University geologist Jim Evans, who, along USU alum Elizabeth Petrie, currently of Western State Colorado University, participated in an international research project aimed at assessing geological formations able to effectively contain carbon dioxide emissions. Read the full Science Daily article here.

 

Standard ExaminerStandard-Examiner: Perry students learn about earthquake fault in their backyard
Perry is pinched right along the Wasatch Fault Zone, which makes it perfectly positioned for students to learn about the ever-changing cycles of rocks. Read the full article by Leia Larsen in the Standard-Examiner here.

Grads Utah State Today: Three Geology Students among Twelve Aggies Recognized in NSF Grad Research Fellow Search
Three of USU's twelve National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship search are from USU Geology. The honorees were selected from nearly 17,000 applicants. Congratulations to NSF Graduate Research Fellow James Mauch and Honorable Mention recipients Jordan Jensen and Michael Berry. Read the full article by Mary-Ann Muffoletto in Utah State Today here.

 

Microscopy Core Facility Utah State Today: Geology Rocks! Aspiring Scientists Visit USU's Microscopy Core Facility
If you want to learn about geology, the first thing to do is go outside and find some interesting rocks. That's the advice Utah State University professor Jim Evans gave to 5th and 6th grade students from Perry, Utah's, Promontory School for Expeditionary Learning, who visited USU's campus March 30. Read the full article by Mary-Ann Muffoletto in Utah State Today here.

Dinosaur Utah State Today: A New Name for and Old Dinosaur
Paleontologists from Utah and Connecticut, including Dr. Kenneth Carpenter at Utah State University Eastern, have given a new name for a dinosaur that was discovered near Alcova, Wyoming, in 1914. Read the full article by John DeVilbiss in Utah State Today here.